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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #26 Comcast.

Laurie Hix's picture

When Comcast moved into Michigan, it needed a high-speed kick start, so it hired Brogan. We got up to speed in no time and soon were also servicing another division of the company, Comcast Chicago. Over the years, working with both divisions we turned around a lot of great work in record time (no dial up, here!).

One of our favorite Comcast retail marketing campaigns was the Guru campaign. At the time, technology was changing rapidly and Comcast was on the forefront of developing new products and services (remember when no one knew what On-Demand was?). To appeal to tech early-adopters, we created a campaign centered around a wise and all-knowing Guru who pointed to path to enlightenment: of course, it was Comcast. The work moved beyond traditional mediums such as television, radio, print and outdoor to a microsite, online games, non-traditional outdoor, flash mobs and PR stunts.

It was more than a triple play. It was an integrated marketing home run. Looking back to the first time we were briefed about Comcast On-Demand, I had no idea how much I personally would come to depend on it. TV On-Demand? The Guru was right. It is the path to happiness.

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

 

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5 types of online content people love to share, from BuzzFeed’s CEO

Steve St. Germain's picture

BuzzFeed founder and CEO Jonah Peretti recently shared his thoughts on increasing online content popularity over an Adcraft lunch in Detroit.  Of course, there are a number of factors that contribute to online sharing and driving clicks, but some key factors outweigh others.  So what are the most popular share statements; and which ultimately make us want to share with our social networks?  Marketers take note: 

5 popular content topics that drive social shares:

      1. Content as Identity.  People share content that is personal to them.

      2. Capturing the Moment.  Look what just happened!

      3. Cute Animals Deserve Respect.  Cat GIFs are popular for a reason.

      4. Humor is Inherently Social.  Who doesn’t love a good laugh?

      5. Human Rights Issues.  Let’s talk about things that matter.

Context is also important, particularly location and regional identity.  It’s the idea that posting a video of a local landmark is more likely to gain interest or spark engagement among those who live near it.
 
The same type of notion could also be applied to branded content. The most difficult part (and what brands often struggle with) is making that connection.  Understanding what your audience cares about and aligning that with your message is one of the simplest formulas for creating effective content that spreads.
 
social content strategy
 

There's no place like the "the Feed."

Another interesting and very future-facing perspective is that new media, “the feed” in particular, is a place where consumers increasingly seek refuge and comfort. Think about it. Newsfeed algorithms are looking at your online habits, at your every click, factoring in the time of day and what you’ve missed.  The purpose?  Serving up fresh, delicious content that entertains and make you happy.
 
Online actions will continue to evolve over time.  And as new online services emerge, people will find new reasons and new motivations for sharing.  The key is to continually listen to your consumers online, note their interests and social habits then develop content that best reflects their tastes.
 
Today, 75 percent of users who visit BuzzFeed come to the site looking for something to share—a statistic that helps illustrate why the site has become a premier destination.  BuzzFeed now finds itself among the top 25 online properties in the U.S., surpassing a handful of even the most longstanding news entities. 
 
 
The 700-person company now houses its own dedicated news division, complete with a staff of tenured journalists and reporters who are breaking stories and actually scooping other newsrooms.  Not to mention, they’ve built out a new experimental creative warehouse in L.A. dedicated to video, allowing creators to come from all over and “try something new.” BuzzFeed is now serving up more than 500MM monthly video views, half of which occur on mobile.
 

Before BuzzFeed, there was the NY rejection line.

During his presentation, Peretti was lighthearted, funny—downright hilarious at times.  About 20 minutes in, I realized that the success of BuzzFeed was no accident.  Unlike its famous listicles, it wasn’t some overnight sensation.  Peretti has been at this a long time.  At 40, Peretti is a graduate of the MIT Media Lab with a deep understanding of new media and how it’s able to spread.
 
He spoke of a past side project, the NY Rejection Line that he and his sister, comedian Chelsea Peretti, created in 2000. It was a number phone number you could give away at the bar to someone you preferred not to see again. The Rejection Line was one of the Internet’s first viral successes, spreading wildly via email in six months, even landing on CNN.  This eventually spurred Peretti to coin the term “contagious media.”
 
Craving even more content?
 
 

 

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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #26 Brogan Promotions.

Kaitlynn Knopp's picture

Over our 30-year history, Brogan & Partners has spent the majority of that time promoting all of the great clients we’ve had the opportunity to work with… but we’ve always found a little time to promote ourselves, too.

Whether we were hosting a competition for Michigan-based companies to win a complete marketing makeover or hosting a party for all of our media representatives, people have noticed Brogan & Partners the same way people noticed our founder, Marcie Brogan, when she first started the agency.

With her iconic red-rimmed glasses, signature shoulder pads and ingenious ideas, Marcie was larger than life, and she founded an agency that was, too.

What’s your favorite Brogan promotion? Tell us in the comments below.

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

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Effective nonprofit social media marketing campaign example #4: Department of Health.

Maila Kue's picture

Nothing makes you cringe more than an awkward conversation. And when you’re a young teen forced to talk about topics such as drugs, smoking, alcohol, and dare I say – sex, the last people you want to hear from is your parents. Yikes! We’d feel awkward for you.

But just because it’s awkward doesn’t mean it should be avoided. The Department of Health in England launched the Awkward Conversations Project and made it their goal to talk with teenagers about difficult (and embarrassing) issues that can be damaging to their health.

Research showed that stating the facts wasn’t enough to change behaviors. Rather, starting conversations was more effective in challenging teens to stop unhealthy behaviors. But since they were dodging these discussions with their parents, the Department of Health decided to find people who were already well-trusted by this target audience.  Who better to use than the UK’s most popular teenage YouTube vloggers?  The Department of Health selected 10 vloggers and asked them to create relevant videos that would eventually lead to teen engagement and conversations.

The results? The videos received over 5 million views, over 130,000 likes, and all 10 videos were featured in the ‘Top 50 Most Liked Videos on YouTube’ on the day it was uploaded. But the campaigns biggest success was getting their audience to stop avoiding these conversations and to start talking. The campaign prompted an additional 19 video responses, which attracted an additional 4,500 views. Now that’s a successful marketing campaign we can’t stop talking about.   

Which of the 10 videos did you enjoy most? To see more nonprofits making a difference, check out the rest of my series, 10 Nonprofit Marketing Campaigns That Effectively Use Social Media.

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Ford, Always and CVS: 3 brands targeting Millennials with inspiring ads.

Emily Marchak's picture

Get ready to be inspired. Three big brands set out this year with bigger, more powerful marketing messages that speak Millennial. Using themes of integrity, empowerment and change—values that motivate Millennials to buy and be loyal—companies like Ford, CVS, and Always are changing the course and content of advertising. The nation’s largest generational cohort is taking note.

Let’s talk cars. We have seen hamsters, Clint Eastwood, and now Matthew McConaughey.  But what about a Millennial? In the “Upside: Anything is Possible” commercial, Ford demonstrates their keen interest in Millennials by incorporating tailored content all wrapped into an empowering, inspiring message.

Created in response to Cadillac's "Poolside" commercial, which features their electric car with an elitist agenda, Ford instead has a different message—one of inspiration. “Upside” features a realistic setting, entrepreneur job and diverse culture, all of which encourage the well-being of not only Detroit, but for all the Millennials that “work hard, to do better.”  The take-away from this “in-response” ad is simple… get your hands dirty, help make the world a better place. Ford is demonstrating that they care, generating a positive impression among the Millennials.

Let’s talk women. How many times have we heard the qualifying phrase—like a girl? How many times have we heard it in a positive light? Always is taking a stand and changing the way this generation looks at this phrase. In a playful series of question and answer, this clever TV commercial asks Millennials of all ages, genders, and races what it means to –throw like a girl, run like a girl and fight like a girl. The beginning of this commercial sheds some light on the negative stereotypes the phrase connotes, with men and women acting out the clueless, weak female caricature. Ultimately, Always encourages Millennials to “make #likeagirl mean amazing things.” How’s that for some inspiration?

Let’s talk health. In October, CVS dropped tobacco products from its shelves and with it, $2 billion in annual revenue, all in the name of health. What’s more, CVS is helping smokers quit the habit, as well as initiating programs that will help their workers quit smoking, help patients take medicine on time, as well as expand their minute clinic. How inspiring.

To learn more about how to market to Millennials, download our free white paper: Marketing to Millennials: How to Engage this Important Audience.

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The Weekly Recap - December 8, 2014

Ellyn Davidson's picture

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

Facebook Launches Call-to-Action Buttons on Business Pages
Great news, marketers: Facebook just announced a feature that can help drive more traffic from your Facebook Page to your website: a call-to-action button.

Mobile Search Will Surpass Desktop in 2015
Mobile to pass desktop in search ad dollars next year.

How to Create Effective Facebook Ads by Being Ridiculously Personal
The very first step to creating effective Facebook ads is creating a buyer persona.

5 Ways to Improve Your Instagram Marketing
Is there a place for Instagram in your marketing plan?

The evolution of TV advertising – three predictions for 2015
Media consumption has changed beyond recognition over the past few years.

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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #25 The HoneyBaked Ham Company.

Laura Pryor's picture

Since 2006, Brogan & Partners has had the privilege of advertising one of America’s favorite foods: HoneyBaked Ham. HoneyBaked’s willingness to experiment with a variety of different media and creative concepts has given us the chance to explore and grow as an agency—and grow HoneyBaked’s market at the same time.

The holidays are HoneyBaked’s bread and butter (and Ham and Turkey), so during the holiday season of 2008, we decided to get their message out very, very loudly . . . by screaming it. We created a TV spot featuring the Screaming Banshee, a popular character from Hallmark e-cards. The spot positioned HoneyBaked Ham as a tasty hero, rescuing stressed-out consumers from holiday overload. We even created a coordinating holiday e-card.  

In 2010, we convinced HoneyBaked’s many divisions to collaborate on a national Facebook page. In the first year of its launch, the page attracted more than 40,000 fans, and this year, it reached the 100,000 fan mark. Starting with simple posts describing their delicious offerings, the page has grown to include games, contests, charitable promotions and more.  

In 2012, we pinned down yet another new strategy for HoneyBaked: their Pinterest page. We launched it with a “12 Days of Christmas” sweepstakes, asking fans to re-pin our festive artwork to enter. By the end of the holidays, HoneyBaked had over 2000 followers.

Brogan and HoneyBaked’s latest venture: Their own holiday station on Pandora (HoneyBaked Holiday Radio). HoneyBaked may be a traditional favorite, but thanks to their willingness to experiment with new media, their marketing will never be old-fashioned.

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

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Effective nonprofit social media marketing campaign example #3: charity:water.

Maila Kue's picture

Since 2006, charity:water has been working hard to bring clean and safe drinking water to people in developing nations. With more than 800 million people in the world without access to clean water, this nonprofit is taking steps to make a difference. But what makes them stand out from the other 1.1 million nonprofit organizations in the United States?

charity:water was one of the first brands on Instagram. They’ve taken advantage of the social media app to showcase their efforts to deliver clean water to developing nations. But it’s more than just displaying amazing photography. It’s an invitation to hear the stories of individuals who have been impacted. Instagram personalizes these stories by displaying a photo of a person alongside a caption that shares how clean water has changed their lives. 800 million is no longer an ambiguous statistic. charity:water puts a name and a face to millions of individuals who are fighting daily to have clean water.

With over 200,000 followers, charity:water invites supporters to improve the lives of others through clean water. By taking the time to share stories through social media, they build credibility with their fans and show that they care. This approach to personalization through real life stories has inspired people to support their mission. It’s even inspired them to dedicate a page on their website to tell stories, which has tremendously increased donation. Follow charity:water on Instagram today to see how lives are being changed. 

 

What story will you tell using Instagram? To see more nonprofits making a difference, check out the rest of my series, 10 Nonprofit Marketing Campaigns That Effectively Use Social Media.

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The Weekly Recap - December 1, 2014

Ellyn Davidson's picture

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

The Evolution of SEO
This simple infographic will show you what SEO used to be and what SEO is now.

A Guide To Optimizing Your Social Media Marketing Campaign
We often hear about website and search engine optimization, but social media optimization hasn’t quite made it into the mainstream vernacular.

What does it take to tell a powerful visual story?
We interviewed Mashable's Jeff Petriello, head of visual storytelling on the marketing team, to get the conversation started on the latest visual trends.

Visual Influence: A Top Media Trend For 2015
If you touch media, marketing or PR in 2015, hang on for a wild ride.

Twitter: What to expect in 2015
Around this time last year, the big question about Twitter was how much would the social network and the company's culture change after going public.

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Effective nonprofit social media marketing campaign example #2: END7.

Maila Kue's picture

END7 is a nonprofit organization that’s working hard to see the end of seven diseases by the year 2020. This movement hopes to stop the suffering of over half a billion children in the developing world. But here’s the problem. When people are presented with charity ads that display gruesome images, such as medical diseases, it’s easy for them to turn away before getting the information they need to help make a difference.  

So how did END7 get around this dilemma? They showed celebrities footage that displayed the morbid effects of these diseases and filmed their reactions. Using social media, a YouTube video was created to challenge viewers to watch the same video that the celebrities were watching. Instead of turning away, this campaign incited a curiosity that held people’s attention. And it worked.

The video went viral and received over 300,000 views in just the first week of its release. It was ranked #5 on YouTube’s “Most Popular on the Web” list. The video also generated £60,000 of donations in the first week, which went toward treating and protecting over 120,000 children from all seven diseases for an entire year.

Did this marketing campaign make you curious? To see more nonprofits making a difference, check out the rest of my series, 10 Nonprofit Marketing Campaigns That Effectively Use Social Media.

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Effective nonprofit social media marketing campaign example #1: UNICEF.

Maila Kue's picture

Chances are if you’ve ever been on Pinterest, you know the feeling of losing track of time as you scroll through countless images on the website. Like it? Want it? Pin it. Pinterest is a visual platform that allows its users to create virtual wish lists for just about anything – dream closet, mouthwatering recipes, future home décor, etc. You name it. Pinterest will provide a variety of options to fulfill your wishes.

UNICEF, a nonprofit organization that raises awareness for child poverty, created a clever campaign using Pinterest as its launching platform. Their strategy? Juxtapose the materialistic aspirations that users may have against the simple needs of a child in poverty.

Ami Musa was created by UNICEF, which featured the profile of a 13-year-old girl from Sierra Leone. Her Pinterest board titled “Really want these,” did not look like the average wish list however. The pinned images foster startling emotions when Ami’s board presented photos of everyday essentials. Her dream closet? A pair of used sandals. Mouthwatering recipe? Grains of rice. Home décor? A rusty faucet. These are the things she dreams of having.

UNICEF put a twist on the luxurious desires on Pinterest to communicate a powerful message. When users clicked on Ami’s photos, they were directed to a donation page on UNICEF’s website that displayed a photo of “Ami” with the following message:

“Children like Ami need basics that many of us take for granted: food, education, healthcare, a clean supply of water. Your donation can help us provide these and other essentials. Thank you.”

What do you think about UNICEF’s use of Pinterest? To see more nonprofits making a difference, check out the beginning post in my series, 10 Nonprofit Marketing Campaigns That Effectively Use Social Media.

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The Weekly Recap - November 17, 2014

Ellyn Davidson's picture

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

4 Creative Ways to Make your Website more Personalized
Your News Feed is customized to your interests and behavior, your online purchases are largely influence by what Amazon's algorithm think you'd like, and you can't open up an email without it saying, "Hi [First Name]."

Facebook: LinkedIn’s next B2B advertising rival?
Facebook is developing a new website called Facebook at work.

What does Snapcash from Snapchat mean for marketers?
Snapchat unveiled its first foray into eCommerce with Snapcash on Tuesday.

How to Optimize Your Images to Work Across Social Networks
Do your images look good on all social platforms?

Someone Mentioned You on Social Media. Should You Respond? [Flow Chart]
When you're first getting started out on a social network, it seems absurd not to respond to anyone who tweets at you, good or bad.

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