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The weekly recap - July 7, 2014.

Ellyn Davidson's picture

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #7 D.O.C.
Brogan & Partners paired celebrity endorsements with outrageous designer frames in the 1988 D.O.C. Optique campaign. 

Five Ways to Make Your Content Resonate with Consumers
The bar has been raised for branded content experiences, here’s how to keep up with the expectations.

A Step-By-Step Guide to Creating Better Facebook Ads [Infographic]
Take advantage of the 1.3 billion Facebook users by developing an audience through effective Facebook ads with this guide.

How to Use Tumblr for Business
If you had the chance to market on a site with upwards of 300 million unique visitors every month, would you do it?

Nielsen and Kraft Pilot New Brand Tracking Tool
Nielsen can now track your advertisements down to an individual ad buy.

Pinterest Makes It Easier to Follow E-commerce Brands
The social pinning platform aims to make it easier for consumers to follow a brand’s page—no longer requiring them to leave a marketer's website to do so. 

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Clever social marketing campaign proves the medium is (still) the message.

Lori Bahnmueller's picture

The medium is the message.

It’s as true today as it was in 1964 when Marshall McLuhan coined the term in his book “The Medium is the Massage.” According to McLuhan, the channel in which people consumed media often trumped even the message itself.

Regardless of the quality of message, if deployed across the wrong channel, it can become skewed, misunderstood or lost altogether.

It’s why Red Bull leans heavily on social media and experiences, and lightly on TV. (Red Bull gives you wings is best articulated by extreme feats captured on helmet cams and served via YouTube.) It’s why Trader Joe’s mails its Fearless Flyers rather than emails. (It’s welcomed into your home, tactile and fun, nurturing the personal brand relationship.) It’s why billboards will eternally be part of the fast food media mix. (Billboard = I can smell the fries from my car.)

And it’s why Dr. Ronald Victor, director of Cedars-Sinai Center for Hypertension in Los Angeles, is partnering with barbershops to improve the health of black men.

If Mohammed won’t come to the mountain

Victor recently received an $8.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund a study testing whether barbershop medicine could significantly lessen hypertension in African-American men.  

Largely because of hypertension-related problems, African American men are expected to live to age 69—ten years less than white men. The study will involve getting barbers around the city trained to take their patients' blood pressure.

Barbershops are a central part of the African American male narrative in the United States, according to blackamericanweb.com. Men may visit the doctor’s office once a year, while they’re likely to visit their barber at least six times as often.

"The idea is, instead of starting out by asking patients, as usual, to come in to the hallowed halls of medicine, we're bringing medicine to the people who need it," Victor told NPR.

The barber is the message. He’s respected, trusted and frequented. It’s a personal relationship that can carry a heavy message like preventing heart disease.

In the chaos of media today, nontraditional marketing is fast gaining utility. Brogan & Partners regularly employs nontraditional channels to meet consumers where they are most susceptible to messages. That may be a bar, car, bus stop, laptop, cell phone, home or someplace altogether different. Often it’s a combination thereof. Always, we take the path that leads us to the consumer.

We have to go to Mohammed.

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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #7 D.O.C.

Marcie Brogan's picture

In 1988 D.O.C.then a large independent optical retailer run by Richard Goldenopened a specialty boutique featuring designer eyewear. Optique had a limited number of stores and an equally limited budget. AHA! thought RichardBrogan Kabot!
 
AHA! thought Marcie and Annacelebrity endorsements. But celebrities we did not have to pay for, those considered in the public domain. So we paired together an outrageous designer frame, an unlikely “spokesperson” and a headshaker of a pun.

GLASSESNOST with Russian Premier Mikail Gorbachev and chunky red frames was our debut of this series of print ads. Followed, of course, by SUNGLASSESNOST.
 

We found a lot of fodder in the British royals; we featured a couple of local celebsBill Bonds and Jerry Greenwald; we got a cease and desist order from Ollie North; we did a serious nod to Nelson Mandela. But mostly we and D.O.C. got kudos and creative awards and attentionlike making the front cover of Advertising Age. Most importantly, the boutiques thrived and built a brand as a cool place to get funky and fashionable glasses.

Which celebrity would you have liked to see us use in this campaign? To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

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8 Apps to Make Social Media Management Easier.

Kaitlynn Knopp's picture

As a community manager at Brogan & Partners, I’m interacting on different social media channels on a minute by minute basis, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. But as anyone who works in social media knows, it’s not always the easiest job. There’s content to create, pages to manage, comments to reply to, news feeds to keep up with, followers to retain and gain and metrics to report upon. Some days, it’s enough to make your head spin!

If you’re doing all of that and more, this blog series full of tips and tricks is for you. Here are 8 apps I've used to make social media management easier.

  1. Pages
  2. Later
  3. Bitly
  4. Wi-Fi Finder
  5. Tweet A Day
  6. Tweegram
  7. TextonPS
  8. PhotoGrid

If you have any apps to add to this list, leave me a comment, and I will check them out.

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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #6: Michigan Department of Community Health: AIDS Campaign.

Marcie Brogan's picture

In 1988, AIDS was a mysterious, terrifying and fatal disease.  Misinformation and paranoia about AIDS was spreading faster than the disease itself. To help prevent the disease and get the real facts to the public, the State of Michigan put out an RFP for a $1 million AIDS prevention campaign—a brave and farsighted move by Governor Jim Blanchard and marketing program managers Jean Chabut and Jan Ruff.     

Virtually every ad agency in Michigan was in the hunt for the groundbreaking assignment. Reporter Rick Ratliff from the Detroit Free Press chose to follow Brogan Kabot in our quest, sitting in on brainstorming sessions, writing about our preparation process and even attending the pitch itself. 

Amazingly, our tiny shop won the contract against giants like J. Walter Thompson, and we made the cover of the Free Press Sunday Magazine.

Our first goal:  mitigate fear and ignorance of the disease and its sufferers. We created print ads that clarified what AIDS is and how it is transmitted. And we developed an empathetic TV spot featuring an actual AIDS patient and his partner, to humanize the face of AIDS for Michigan viewers. 

Over the next several years, we used research and focus groups to develop compelling messages to teens, prostitutes, gay men, sex partners of heterosexual and gay men, and Hispanic and African American populations. Our approach varied:  we used empathy, concern for family and out-and-out scare tactics.

We even used humor... and advertising on urinal mats. 

The campaign got thousands of at-risk individuals into state testing facilities, helped change attitudes towards AIDS and its patients and was featured by the national Centers for Disease Control as a successful model.  Brogan Kabot received a shelf full of awards for the campaign. But most importantly, we had the opportunity to use our marketing skills to do good, make a difference and actually save lives. How many advertisers can say that?

Tell us about your favorite do-good advertising, and to see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

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The weekly recap - June 30, 2014.

Ellyn Davidson's picture

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

9 Hilarious Out-of-Office Email Auto-Replies
As you prepare to leave for a long weekend or a week away, enjoy a quick laugh.

Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #5 Henry Ford Hospital.
From 1984-1990 Brogan & Partners ran a campaign that helped take Henry Ford Hospital to the next level and broke new ground for healthcare marketing.

Ad Age Survey: How Advertisers Are Spending on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube
More marketers plan to increase their budgets for Twitter than for Facebook.

CMOs Are Preparing for Digital to Grow to 75% of Marketing Budgets
Nearly half are worried about managing this digital shift.

How to Make Your Company Stand Out on Instagram
With Instagram engagement 58 times higher per follower than Facebook, your business should know how to stand out.

How to Make (or Break) a Service Brand
In a service based economy, a winning service brand is all you need for success.

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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #5 Henry Ford Hospital.

Laurie Hix's picture

It’s hard to imagine that there was a time when hospital marketing did not include broadcast media. In 1984, one of our first clients was Henry Ford Hospital.  In repositioning their brand, we helped them be the first hospital in Michigan to use broadcast media. Henry Ford Hospital was a long-standing, well-known brand, but consumers had low awareness of all their facilities, specialties and capabilities. After extensive customer and physician research, we learned what female healthcare decision makers wanted when choosing a hospital and what physicians want when referring to a hospital.  In response to the research, the hospital reconfigured its main campus to a collection of specialties (i.e. Henry Ford Heart & Vascular Institute, Henry Ford Bone & Joint Institute, etc.) Henry Ford also built a series of suburban medical centers to attract patients in new emerging growth markets.

The creative was based around the themeline: “More specialists make us more than a hospital.” And the name was changed from Henry Ford Hospital to Henry Ford Hospital and Specialty Centers. We created TV spots to build high awareness and we developed a unique fixed spot media approach during the Channel 4 “Health Report” on Channel 7 Local Evening News. We also leveraged regional editions of national publications to increase regional awareness.

The campaign ran from 1984-1990 and increased clinic visits and new patient volumes every year and closed the gap between Henry Ford and the competition. Our early work with Henry Ford, may have broken new ground in healthcare marketing as the first Michigan hospital to advertise on television, but it set Brogan on an innovative path of healthcare marketing that would win both awards and build the bottom line over the last three decades.

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising. http://www.brogan.com/blog/celebrating-30-years-creative-advertising

 

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Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #4: WJLB.

Laura Pryor's picture

In the mid 80’s Brogan Kabot got a call from WJLB Radio general manager Verna Green.  She had created a new theme—Strong Songs --for this powerful urban-formatted music and talk station and wanted to incarnate it on TV and billboard.

Incarnate it we did! Our creative strategy was to use glam bodybuilders pumping to one the station’s signature songs.

The grueling task of interviewing men in Speedos for two days fell to Anna and Marcie. After many callbacks the three stars (including a gorgeously muscular young woman) were picked, oiled, and filmed. The spot was an immediate hit and ran for several years.  As one nostalgic YouTube commenter summed it up:  “Dude, this commercial was the bomb as an 80s kid.” 

Bumper stickers and billboards picked up on the theme, featuring a powerful flexing bicep tattooed with the WJLB-FM 98 logo and the headline, “Detroit’s Strongest Songs.”

During the run of the Strong Songs campaign, WJLB exploded in the ratings with its strong theme, strong management, and strong morning man John Mason.

Later, the agency recycled one of the TV commercial’s stars into a cover for Glenda Greenwald’s Michigan Woman magazine--the issue exploring how to market cars to women.

Do you remember Mason in the Morning and Strong Songs? What was your favorite Detroit station growing up? 

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series:  Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

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Let’s make “like a girl” a good thing.

Kaitlynn Knopp's picture

When I was younger, I was on a T-Ball team. I couldn’t run the fastest, hit the hardest, or throw the farthest, which, to the boys on my team only meant one thing. I played like a girl.

At a young age, you don’t always realize that playing “like a girl” is a bad thing… until you hear it enough. Suddenly, every time I couldn’t hit the ball into the outfield or throw the ball from right field to first base, I was reminded what a “girl” I was, and I ultimately realized it was an insult.

Yesterday, Always released a video empowering those who have been told they do something like a girl—turning the phrase into something positive, something to be proud of.

As an advertising agency that specializes in marketing to women, we support the message Always is trying to convey, and we admire their efforts. Here’s hoping that with enough people on board, we can rewrite the rules—making it universally known that “like a girl” is something great.

What are you proud to do like a girl?

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The weekly recap - June 23, 2014.

Ellyn Davidson's picture

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

8 Rookie Facebook Mistakes No One Should Still Be Making
Just because your business has a Page doesn’t mean that you’re using it right.

So You Launched a Blog – Now What?
How do you take your blog to the next level and sustain your blogging?

Marketing to Millennials: How to engage this important audience.
Trends are always changing, which means brands are constantly developing marketing strategies that are engaging and relevant to their audience.

Are Celebrity Endorsements Worth It?
Have you ever based a purchasing decision off of a celebrity because he or she endorsed it?

Facebook Engagement Among Brands Is Actually Up, Report Says
Socialbakers looked at 3 million of the largest brand Pages and found interactions have jumped 30% since January.
 

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Marketing to Millennials: How to engage this important audience.

Maila Kue's picture

Trends are always changing, which means brands are constantly developing marketing strategies that are engaging and relevant to their audience. And since Millennials are driving the trends today, it’s important to know how to market to this generation. They’ve been shaped by technology, social media, and the economic decline. These factors are vital in helping us better understand the values of Millennials and how this influences their role as consumers today.

There’s something to be said about a generation with an expected annual spending power of 2.45 trillion dollars by the year 2015. Millennials have shifted the approach of marketing. They are setting the standards of what is expected from society. It’s no longer the consumer who adapts to the brand. But rather, brands are challenged to adapt to the consumer. They are forced to change their marketing strategies in order to meet Millennials where they’re at – with proof that their brand have something worthy to offer. Perhaps this could explain why we are seeing changes to even the most traditional brands – like the look of Campbell’s homemade can of soup or the shape of your ordinary chapstick. It’s no doubt that brands are working hard to appeal to this generation. So if you’re looking for ways to market your brand to this complex generation, there are a few things you need to consider.

To learn more about marketing to Millennials, download our free whitepaper, “8 Rules of Marketing to Millennials.” What about this generation interests you the most?

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Are Celebrity Endorsements Worth It?

Jazmine Robinson's picture

It’s no secret. I’m a huge Beyoncé fan. Some may even call me obsessive-compulsive. Her influence is evident in the life-size poster that hangs in my living room, CDs in my bookshelves and assorted concert keepsakes. What’s not so obvious is her influence over other purchase decisions, made largely because of her association with them—a swimsuit from H&M, Pepsi and more.

Have you ever based a purchasing decision off of a celebrity because he or she endorsed it? Have you reserved a room from Priceline.com because of Kaley Cuoco and William Shatner? Purchased a Vitamin Water because Kevin Hart drinks it?

Brands have used celebrities to sell their products for years: Fabio and I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter!, Mark Wahlberg and Calvin Klein Underwear; and we can’t forget, Billy Cosby and Jello Pudding. Today, big companies still shell out millions of dollars in celebrity endorsements each year.  

But is it really worth the money and the risk?

Less Celebrity. More Focus on Consumer.
In a recent survey conducted by WP Engine (“industrial-strength Word Press hosting platform”), 96 percent of participants said they don’t want to read celebrities blogging about products. The study revealed that consumers aren’t interested in a product simply because a celebrity is associated with it. Companies should instead spend more time focusing on how their product fulfills the consumer’s needs and wants.

Brand reputation can also be threatened when celebrity front-men go off script. Just like you and me, celebrities are human. They make mistakes, which can result in a negative impact on a brand. Think back to the infidelity scandal that Tiger Woods was involved in. Before the incident, he was one of the biggest celebrity endorsers in the world. Soon after the incident, companies like Accenture quickly terminated partnerships with him.

Mommy Bloggers Beat Celebrity Moms.
As an alternative to celebrity endorsements, businesses are swapping to prominent bloggers and vloggers for promotion instead. A 2001 survey conducted by BlogHer and Ketchum revealed that 20 percent of women are persuaded by a familiar blogger versus only 13 percent being persuaded by a celebrity endorsement. Take our client, HoneyBaked Ham for example. Instead of a celebrity endorsement, HoneyBaked Ham enlisted dozens of bloggers to help spread the word during the Easter season. Bloggers had the opportunity to try HoneyBaked products and post about it on their blog. Instead of forcing a connection between their product and a celebrity, popular bloggers were able to post honestly about their experience. The result? Consumer engagement that helps elevate brands, not celebrity status.

In a survey conducted by Nielsen inPowered, 900 people were asked what kind of information they seek when they make a purchase, from home appliances to insurance. Forty-six percent said they rely on expert advice and, as Media Bistro puts it, “fame does not make one an expert on anything other than being famous.”

Tell me about the outfit you purchased or a hair product you tested because of a celebrity endorser. I can’t be the only one!

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